I am a faculty member in the Department of Biochemistry of the Duke University School of Medicine. Though my title is “Assistant Research Professor,” my main responsibility is in fact teaching: I am the course director for our main undergraduate introductory courses, which I teach each semester. I am interested in how we can best teach the ideas of biochemistry to new students, and my work outside the classroom is devoted to designing better presentations of biochemical concepts.

Duke undergraduates who are interested in learning more about our main introductory biochemistry course should check out the page on Biochem 301. Further Learning Opportunities outlines some of the options for students who have completed Biochem 301 and would like to take further classes or become involved in research in our department.

As an undergraduate, I did research on protein structure and enzymology, which led to a doctoral dissertation on improving nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies for protein structure determination. Though I am no longer actively engaged in this research, more information—including links to key publications and to software source code—is available at my NMR page.

Recent News

FAQ: Synchronous vs. Asynchronous Enrollment in Biochem 301 Spring 2021

The terms synchronous and asynchronous might not have been very well known outside of computing circles until this last year, but they are now everywhere at Duke, borrowed into the coronavirus academic lexicon as descriptions for classes that meet online. The former refers to classes that meet interactively in real time; the latter to courses that are …

FAQ: Synchronous vs. Asynchronous Enrollment in Biochem 301 Spring 2021 Read More »

Announcing a New Collaboration with ARC: SAGE for Biochem 301

One of the most exciting recent changes to Biochem 301 has been the addition of a program of optional small discussion groups, which are led by undergraduates who previously took the course. The first such experiment was last summer (Summer Term 2020), prompted in part by the urgent need to have some kind of discussion …

Announcing a New Collaboration with ARC: SAGE for Biochem 301 Read More »